Is PostJoint The Answer To Your Blogger Outreach Woes?

 

Blogger outreach has become an essential part of the SEO process; with links generated from article marketing or (a great deal of) directories now passing little-to-no-value, the link building emphasis has shifted towards gaining high quality editorial links from blogs and other web-based publications.

Blogger outreach is a rewarding but ultimately time-consuming (and therefore costly) process that involves hours spent finding potential leads, investigating those leads, generating some content (or at least content ideas) for those specific leads and then pitching that content. Should the content get published, you are then tasked with monitoring the performance of the content and – depending on the whims of the publishing site – pushing it out on social media.

PostJoint is a website that aims to make the blogger outreach process easier, and in all fairness, it certainly does that. It’s a tool that connects writers who want to get their content published externally with bloggers searching for content, in much the same way sites like MyBlogGuest do. However, PostJoint has some fundamental differences in the way it works and the way you connect to potential outreach leads.

 

[Please note: this is in no way intended to be an objective review of PostJoint, but rather a reflection on my personal experience with the product. If you want to have a play around with PostJoint yourself, check out the site – it’s currently free to use and well worth experimenting with]

Overview

The first thing that struck me about PostJoint was how simple it was (and I mean that in a good way). Registration is quick and easy; stick in the usual details, add a company and you’re more or less ready to go. You can choose to either register as a blogger (i.e. someone who is looking for content) or as an advertiser (i.e. someone who wants to get their content published elsewhere).

Once you’ve registered, you can start submitting posts straight away. The process of submitting content is as easy as pasting it into a WYSIWG text editor and formatting the post as you would for publication on your own site. At the end of the post, you’re invited to add an author byline including, yes, links.

It’s the next part of the process where things start to get a little murky. Before throwing your post out for the collective blogging masses to pore over, you’re given the option to select a ‘max payout’ for your post – essentially, are you willing to pay to get this post published?

The price ranges between ‘free’ and ‘$500’, with the guarantee that first refusal will be offered to higher PR and DA blogs depending on how much you pay (for example, if you select $100, PR4 blogs are given priority).

 

For the purposes of this post, I chose to experiment with both free and the $50 option (although it’s important to note that we did not follow up on the paid offers!). Interestingly, if you choose the free option, your post has to be over 600 words and pass through human editors before it goes live, while the paid option bypasses this process.

Once you’ve chosen your option, your post is then live for bloggers to review (the idea your writing sells the post rather than having to craft a pitch) and make you an offer. You get a maximum of five offers, at which point you can either accept one and reject the others, or reject them all and repost in the hope of getting better quality offers.

Upon acceptance, your post gets published, the blogger gets content, you get links, everyone’s happy. There’s even a little eBay-esque feedback system where you can tell everyone what a pleasure the blogger was to work with, which is nice.

Verdict

So, will PostJoint be replacing all of the blogger outreach processes we currently have in place? In a word, no. As simple and easy as PostJoint makes outreach (and I can’t emphasise enough how easy it is), it’s arguably this simplicity that leads to most of its flaws.

I’ll get the good parts out of the way first; adding a new post and managing campaigns is perfectly simple and it provides an excellent way of keeping track of your outreach campaigns. Usability-wise, I can’t fault PostJoint.

It’s the part where offers start rolling in when PostJoint starts to fall down. Like I said earlier in the post, I experimented with both the free and paid options, submitting posts for quite obscure niches in both instances.

The offers that I received were varied to say the least. For one post, I received a selection of pretty relevant sites with a pretty diverse set of quality metrics. None of the blogs were particularly brilliant but for an hour or so of work, they were good enough.

For the other post, however, I received five completely irrelevant offers from blogs that seemed to have little to do with my content beyond the fact they were both hosted on the internet and both featured words. These offers rolled in one after the other in quick succession (I think I hit my five offers in less than an hour).

Surprisingly, it was the latter post that was the paid offering. I’ve found – and Vicky (my fellow copywriter) has found this too – that posts marked ‘free’ receive much more relevant offers than those marked ‘paid’. I’m not sure if this is because of bloggers looking to make a quick buck and taking any old content to make a bit of cash, but I would highly recommend going for the free option over paid on the basis of my experience so far. It’s also the ‘Google-friendly’ route to take, which makes it a much safer option.

Ultimately, PostJoint suffers from the same problems as other sites and tools that try to make guest blogging easier, like MyBlogGuest and BloggerLinkUp, do – too many people abusing the system to score a few quick wins. It’s a real shame, but it’s to be expected from any kind of tool that condenses hours of work into a half-hour process. Again, this is no fault of the team behind PostJoint.

That’s not to say PostJoint isn’t useful, though. For some of the broader posts Vicky and I have submitted to PostJoint, we’ve built some genuinely decent links and found leads to build ongoing relationships with.

In conclusion, PostJoint is a useful but flawed tool for blogger outreach. While no-one is going to have much success if they rely solely on the tool for their outreach efforts (and shouldn’t expect to, in all honesty), PostJoint does have value as part of a wider mix of outreach tools and could serve as a useful complement to your current outreach and online marketing efforts. So not a game-changer, as such, but another way to make blogger outreach that little bit easier.

fluidcreativity
  • Written by on 18th April 2013 at 09:26
  • “Fluid Creativity is an award-winning, multi-service digital agency based in Manchester.”
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  • SaleemYaqub

    Hey Chris. I’m the founder of PostJoint and would like to thank you for the detailed write up. Glad to hear that you like the usability of the system – we’ve worked hard to keep it simple. You’re right in saying that the system is being abused by some who are looking for quick wins. We know that our success depends on being able to fight the spammers and we are working hard to increase relevance and quality. This will all happen behind the scenes with the simplicity of the interface staying in check. Some of the ways we are doing this include stricter moderation controls, the ability to block certain blogs and users from interacting with you, a re-vamped feedback system and a new relevance algorithm based on flexible keywords. All of this is due to be released in the next few months and we’ve already come a long way since the first public Beta was released in November. New blogs are also joining daily and with this we can afford to be more strict. The ultimate goal is to build a large, top quality community that delivers rapid results for all parties and everyday we do something to inch closer towards this goal. Watch this space and see you soon!

  • SaleemYaqub

    Hey Chris. I’m the founder of PostJoint and would like to thank you for the detailed write up. Glad to hear that you like the usability of the system – we’ve worked hard to keep it simple. You’re right in saying that the system is being abused by some who are looking for quick wins. We know that our success depends on being able to fight the spammers and we are working hard to increase relevance and quality. This will all happen behind the scenes with the simplicity of the interface staying in check. Some of the ways we are doing this include stricter moderation controls, the ability to block certain blogs and users from interacting with you, a re-vamped feedback system and a new relevance algorithm based on flexible keywords. All of this is due to be released in the next few months and we’ve already come a long way since the first public Beta was released in November. New blogs are also joining daily and with this we can afford to be more strict. The ultimate goal is to build a large, top quality community that delivers rapid results for all parties and everyday we do something to inch closer towards this goal. Watch this space and see you soon!

  • Chris Smith

    Hi Saleem, thanks for your response and for taking the time to read the post.

    It’s great to hear that you’re dealing with some of the abusers and spammers; I’ve noticed the blog-blocking function and I’m looking forward to some of the other measures you’ve mentioned coming into force. I perhaps should have put more emphasis on the fact that PostJoint is still in beta in the post, because there is a lot of potential there.

    I’m looking forward to seeing some of the new features and how the service improves in the near future and I wish you and your team the best of luck with meeting the ambitions you’ve set out with regards to the community and quality control.

  • Chris Smith

    Hi Saleem, thanks for your response and for taking the time to read the post.

    It’s great to hear that you’re dealing with some of the abusers and spammers; I’ve noticed the blog-blocking function and I’m looking forward to some of the other measures you’ve mentioned coming into force. I perhaps should have put more emphasis on the fact that PostJoint is still in beta in the post, because there is a lot of potential there.

    I’m looking forward to seeing some of the new features and how the service improves in the near future and I wish you and your team the best of luck with meeting the ambitions you’ve set out with regards to the community and quality control.

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